Nano News Archive April 2010

Tiny particles may help surgeons by marking brain tumors

Columbus, OHIO — Researchers have developed a way to enhance how brain tumors appear in MRI scans and during surgery, making the tumors easier for surgeons to identify and remove. Scientists at Ohio…

Pediatric research focuses on nanopediatrics

Today's nanotechnology research will lead to tomorrow's personalized medicine approaches for children

Philadelphia, PENNSYLVANIA — "Children are not small adults"-pediatricians say that's what makes…

New report calls for citizen participation to guide decision-making on science and technology

Tempe, ARIZONA — As the pace of changing technology quickens, a robust and open national capability for technology assessment – the process of estimating the broad social, ethical, legal and economic…

Researchers theorize acoustic waves may cool microelectronics

nanotechnology thermal graphic

Image source: Rice University

Houston, TEXAS — "Hot sounds" has one meaning to music fans and another to physicists. Count a team of researchers at Rice University among the latter, as they've discovered that acoustic waves…

Purple pokeberries hold secret to affordable solar power worldwide

Winston-Salem, North Carolina — Pokeberries – the weeds that children smash to stain their cheeks purple-red and that Civil War soldiers used to write letters home – could be the key to spreading…

International Labour Organization warns of new health risks from nanotechnology and other emerging technologies 

Geneva, SWITZERLAND — The World Day for Safety and Health at Work will be observed widely this year against a backdrop of newly emerging hazards in the world of work and growing concern over the…

New advances in science of the ultra-small promise big benefits for cancer patients

advances nanotechnology

Gold nanoparticles, the bright structures attached to the cultured human cell in this electron microscope image, are among the ultra-small technologies that may help improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the future. (Credit: Dr. Catherine C. Berry; National Science Foundation)

Washington, DC — A $145-million Federal Government effort to harness the power of nanotechnology to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer is producing innovations that will…

Nanodots breakthrough may lead to ‘a library on one chip’ 

Raleigh, NORTH CAROLINA — A researcher at North Carolina State University has developed a computer chip that can store an unprecedented amount of data – enough to hold an entire library’s worth of…

New views at the nanoscale 

new views at nanoscale

In this diagram, viruses (colored orange) cling to the gold surface (yellow) at the end of a silicon cantilever. A magnetic tip (blue) creates a magnetic field that interacts with the viruses to create an image, using magnetic force resonance microscopy. Image: Martino Poggio, University of Basel

MIT researchers are building a microscope that uses MRI technology to image viruses and other tiny biological structures. 

Cambridge, MASSACHUSETTS — Magnetic resonance imaging, first developed in the…

Physicists capture first images of atomic spin

spin_nanotechnology

The different shape and appearance of these individual cobalt atoms is caused by the different spin directions. (Image courtesy Saw-Wai Hla, Ohio University)

Discovery supports development of nanoscale magnetic storage devices

Athens, OHIO — Though scientists argue that the emerging technology of spintronics may trump conventional electronics for building…

New technique shows unprecedented precision in measuring liquid-solid interaction 

New images improve resolution of measurements by a factor of 10,000 or more

Cambridge, MASSACHUSETTS — Wettability — the degree to which a liquid either spreads out over a surface or forms into…

UCLA engineer invents world's smallest, lightest telemedicine microscope

Portable, lensless device can deliver health care in resource-limited settings

Los Angeles, CALIFORNIA — Aydogan Ozcan, whose invention of a novel lensless imaging technology for use in telemedicine…

Less is more! Nanopatch is 100 times better than needle and syringe

Brisbane, AUSTRALIA — New research, led by Professor Mark Kendall, from the University of Queensland's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, demonstrates that a vaccine…

Can the newest form of carbon be made to bend, twist and roll?

San Diego, CALIFORNIA — Can graphene — a newly discovered form of pure carbon that may one day replace the silicon in computers, televisions, mobile phones and other common electronic devices — be…

Carbon nanotubes boost cancer-fighting cells

New Haven, CONNECTICUT — Yale University engineers have found that the defects in carbon nanotubes — cylindrical carbon molecules with novel properties that are useful in a number of applications,…

Advance made in 'thin film' solar cell technology

Corvallis, OREGON — Researchers have made an important breakthrough in the use of continuous flow microreactors to produce thin film absorbers for solar cells - an innovative technology that could…

New delivery platform reduces blood vessel blockage

vascular stent nanoparticles

Two hours after local delivery of fluorescently labeled magnetic nanoparticles, the red areas indicate significantly larger amounts of nanoparticles in vascular stents in the presence of a magnetic field (A) compared to no magnetic field (B). (Credit: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)

Philadelphia, PENNSYLVANIA — Scientists and engineers have used uniform magnetic fields to drive iron-bearing nanoparticles to metal stents in injured blood vessels, where the particles deliver a…

Sensor gives valuable data for neurological diseases and treatments

West Lafayette, INDIANA — A new biosensor developed at Purdue University can measure whether neurons are performing correctly when communicating with each other, giving researchers a tool to test the…

Ultrasensitive imaging method uses gold-silver 'nanocages', might help in early detection and treatment of diseases

nanocages.php

 New research findings suggest that an experimental ultrasensitive imaging technique that uses a pulsed laser and tiny metallic "nanocages" might enable both the early detection and treatment of disease. This composite image shows luminous nanocages, which appear like stars against a black background, and a living cell, at upper left. The gold-silver nanocages exhibit a bright "three-photon luminescence" when excited by the ultrafast pulsed laser, with 10-times greater intensity than pure gold or silver nanoparticles. The signal allows live cell imaging with negligible damage from heating. (Purdue University graphic/Ji-Xin Cheng)

West Lafayette, INDIANA — New research findings suggest that an experimental ultrasensitive medical imaging technique that uses a pulsed laser and tiny metallic "nanocages" might enable both the…

New nanotechnology biomedical therapy promotes growth of new, stronger cartilage

Palos Heights, ILLINOIS — Dr. Nirav A. Shah, MD, an orthopaedic sports medicine surgeon affiliated with Palos Community Hospital is the first to design a new nanotechnology biomedical therapy that…

Nanotechnology solves acne problems

San Diego, CALIFORNIA — A natural product found in both coconut oil and human breast milk – lauric acid - shines as a possible new acne treatment, thanks to a bioengineering graduate student from the…

Cat brain: A step toward the electronic equivalent

Ann Arbor, MICHIGAN — A cat can recognize a face faster and more efficiently than a supercomputer. That's one reason a feline brain is the model for a biologically-inspired computer project involving…

New method for recovering pricey nanoparticles for reuse may lead to cheaper new generation electronics 

solar panels nanotechnology

Solar panels, flexible displays, and other futuristic electronics made with nanoparticles may become more affordable thanks to a new method that recovers the pricey particles for reuse. (Credit: iStock)

Washington, DC — Scientists are reporting first use of a new method that may make it easier for manufacturers to recover, recycle, and reuse nanoparticles, some of which ounce for ounce can be more…

Stanford researchers find electrical current stemming from plants

Palo Alto, CALIFORNIA — In an electrifying first, Stanford scientists have plugged in to algae cells and harnessed a tiny electric current. They found it at the very source of energy production –…

Tiny diamond sparklers may hold the key to big advances in biomedical imaging technology

nanotechnology

Image: Macquarie University

Sydney, AUSTRALIA — A team of researchers, led by Macquarie University Associate Professor James Rabeau, have discovered that the properties of light emitted from tiny isolated nano-diamonds are…

Study shows that size affects structure of hollow nanoparticles 

nanoparticle

Image of a half-oxidized 26 nanometer nanoparticle. The nickel region is colored red, and the nickel oxide is colored blue and green. Image courtesy of ACS Nano.

Raleigh, NORTH CAROLINA — A new study from North Carolina State University shows that size plays a key role in determining the structure of certain hollow nanoparticles. The researchers focused on…

Australian study: Most effective nano-sunscreens might also be the most toxic                                                            by Aarti Kapoor

Australia — The most effective nanoparticle-containing sunscreens may also come at the cost of being the most harmful, according to an Australian study published online recently in Nature…

Singapore researchers report major step forward in effort to understand and engineer protein structure

SINGAPORE — Researchers in Singapore are reporting this week that they have gleaned key insights into the architecture of a protein that controls iron levels in almost all organisms. Their study…

Graphene films clear major fabrication hurdle

graphene 2

(a) Optical image of a CVD graphene film on a copper layer showing the finger morphology of the metal; (b) Raman 2D band map of the graphene film between the copper fingers over the area marked by the red square on left. (Image from Yuegang Zhang)

Berkeley, CALIFORNIA — Graphene, the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, is a potential superstar for the electronics industry. With freakishly mobile electrons that can blaze through the…

With support, graphene still a superior thermal conductor 

graphene

A one-atom thick sheet of graphene (highlighted in the circular window) on top of a silicon dioxide support proves to be an excellent thermal conductor, according to new research published in the journal Science.

(Credit: University of Texas at Austin)

Super-thin material advances toward next generation applications

Chestnut Hill, MASSACHUSETTS — The single-atom thick material graphene maintains its high thermal conductivity when supported by a…

Scientists discover new principle in materials science

A research team led by Brown University engineers has discovered a new mechanism that governs the peak strength of nanostructured metals. The team found that the deformation of nanotwinned metals is…

Smart orthopedic implants and self-fitting tissue scaffolding using nanoparticle core

Nanoparticle-core polymer holds promise as an absorbable, weight-bearing replacement for traditional graft materials 

Worcester, MASSACHUSETTS — Orthopedic surgeons are often hamstrung by…

New study on carbon nanotubes gives hope for medical applications

Stockholm, SWEDEN — A team of Swedish and American scientists has shown for the first time that carbon nanotubes can be broken down by an enzyme - myeloperoxidase (MPO) - found in white blood cells.…

Nanoscale 'stealth' probe slides into cell walls seamlessly, say Stanford engineers

Stanford engineers have created a nanoscale probe they can implant in a cell wall without damaging the wall. The probe could allow researchers to listen in on electrical signals within the cell. That…

Researchers develop new method to detect melamine in milk

Coral Gables, FLORIDA — University of Miami assistant professor in the College of Engineering, Na Li and her collaborators have developed a fast, economical and easy method to detect melamine in…

Engineers design pill that signals it has been swallowed

Gainesville, FLORIDA — Call them tattletale pills. Seeking a way to confirm that patients have taken their medication, University of Florida engineering researchers have added a tiny microchip and…